China Miéville Perdido Street Station

(12)

Lovelybooks Bewertung

  • 23 Bibliotheken
  • 0 Follower
  • 1 Leser
  • 1 Rezensionen
(5)
(7)
(0)
(0)
(0)

Inhaltsangabe zu „Perdido Street Station“ von China Miéville

When Mae West said, "Too much of a good thing can be wonderful," she could have been talking about China Miéville's <I>Perdido Street Station</I>. The novel's publication met with a burst of extravagant praise from Big Name Authors and was almost instantly a multiaward finalist. You expect hyperbole in blurbs; and sometimes unworthy books win awards, so nominations don't necessarily mean much. But <I>Perdido Street Station</I> deserves the acclaim. It's ambitious and brilliant and--rarity of rarities--sui generis. Its clearest influences are Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast trilogy and M. John Harrison's Viriconium books, but it isn't much like them. It's Dickensian in scope, but fast-paced and modern. It's a love song for cities, and it packs a world into its strange, sprawling, steam-punky city of New Crobuzon. It can be read with equal validity as fantasy, science fiction, horror, or slipstream. It's got love, loss, crime, sex, riots, mad scientists, drugs, art, corruption, demons, dreams, obsession, magic, aliens, subversion, torture, dirigibles, romantic outlaws, artificial intelligence, and dangerous cults. <p> Generous, gaudy, grand, grotesque, gigantic, grim, grimy, and glorious, <I>Perdito Street Station</I> is a bloody fascinating book. It's also so massive that you may begin to feel you're getting too much of a good thing; just slow down and enjoy.<p> Yes, but what is <I>Perdido Street Station</I> about? To oversimplify: the eccentric scientist Isaac Dan der Grimnebulin is hired to restore the power of flight to a cruelly de-winged birdman. Isaac's secret lover is Lin, an artist of the khepri, a humano-insectoid race; theirs is a forbidden relationship. Lin is hired (rather against her will) by a mysterious crime boss to capture his horrifying likeness in the unique khepri art form. Isaac's quest for flying things to study leads to verification of his controversial unified theory of the strange sciences of his world. It also brings him an odd, unknown grub stolen from a secret government experiment so perilous it is sold to a ruthless drug lord--the same crime boss who hired Lin. The grub emerges from its cocoon, becomes an extraordinarily dangerous monster, and escapes Isaac's lab to ravage New Crobuzon, even as his discovery becomes known to a hidden, powerful, and sinister intelligence. Lin disappears and Isaac finds himself pursued by the monster, the drug lord, the government and armies of New Crobuzon, and other, more bizarre factions, not all confined to his world. <I>--Cynthia Ward</I> Beneath the towering bleached ribs of a dead, ancient beast lies New Crobuzon, a squalid city where humans, Re-mades, and arcane races live in perpetual fear of Parliament and its brutal militia. The air and rivers are thick with factory pollutants and the strange effluents of alchemy, and the ghettos contain a vast mix of workers, artists, spies, junkies, and whores. In New Crobuzon, the unsavory deal is stranger to none—not even to Isaac, a brilliant scientist with a penchant for Crisis Theory.<br><br>Isaac has spent a lifetime quietly carrying out his unique research. But when a half-bird, half-human creature known as the Garuda comes to him from afar, Isaac is faced with challenges he has never before fathomed. Though the Garuda's request is scientifically daunting, Isaac is sparked by his own curiosity and an uncanny reverence for this curious stranger.<br><br>While Isaac's experiments for the Garuda turn into an obsession, one of his lab specimens demands attention: a brilliantly colored caterpillar that feeds on nothing but a hallucinatory drug and grows larger—and more consuming—by the day. What finally emerges from the silken cocoon will permeate every fiber of New Crobuzon—and not even the Ambassador of Hell will challenge the malignant terror it invokes . . .<br><br>A magnificent fantasy rife with scientific splendor, magical intrigue, and wonderfully realized characters, told in a storytelling style in which Charles Dickens meets Neal Stephenson, Perdido Street Station offers an eerie, voluptuously crafted world that will plumb the depths of every reader's imagination.<br><br><br><i>From the Trade Paperback edition.</i> <p>Beneath the towering bleached ribs of a dead, ancient beast lies New Crobuzon, a squalid city where humans, Re-mades, and arcane races live in perpetual fear of Parliament and its brutal militia. The air and rivers are thick with factory pollutants and the strange effluents of alchemy, and the ghettos contain a vast mix of workers, artists, spies, junkies, and whores. In New Crobuzon, the unsavory deal is stranger to none -- not even to Isaac, a brilliant scientist with a penchant for Crisis Theory.</p><p>Isaac has spent a lifetime quietly carrying out his unique research. But when a half-bird, half-human creature known as the Garuda comes to him from afar, Isaac is faced with challenges he has never before fathomed. Though the Garuda's request is scientifically daunting, Isaac is sparked by his own curiosity and an uncanny reverence for this curious stranger.</p><p>While Isaac's experiments for the Garuda turn into an obsession, one of his lab specimens demands attention: a brilliantly colored caterpillar that feeds on nothing but a hallucinatory drug and grows larger -- and more consuming -- by the day. What finally emerges from the silken cocoon will permeate every fiber of New Crobuzon -- and not even the Ambassador of Hell will challenge the malignant terror it invokes...</p><p>A magnificent fantasy rife with scientific splendor, magical intrigue, and wonderfully realized characters, told in a storytelling style in which Charles Dickens meets Neal Stephenson, <I>Perdido Street Station</i> offers an eerie, voluptuously crafted world that will plumb the depths of every reader's imagination.</p><hr><p>"[A] phantasmagoric masterpiece... The book left me breathless with admiration."<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="/author.cgi/1143">BRIAN STABLEFORD</A></p><p>"China Mi&eacute;ville's cool style has conjured up a triumphantly macabre technoslip metropolis with a unique atmosphere of horror and fascination."<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="/author.cgi/1215">PETER HAMILTON</A></p><p>"It is the best steampunk novel since Gibson and Sterling's."<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;JOHN CLUTE</p><P>"Ambitious, beautifully written, enormously imaginative, engrossing... A complex fable that blends several genres -- fantasy, horror, gothic, science fiction, and social protest with believable, interesting, and utterly weird, fantastic creature-characters... I could feel my imagination stretched and tweaked by the haunting narrative -- redolent of dreams, nightmares, intuitive whisperings, visions, and tastes of the unconscious.... With its inventive plot, fascinating characters, evocative language, and underlying themes of coexistence among very different beings, economics and politics, crime and punishment, computer consciousness, science and art, <I>Perdido Street Station</I> is in the end both complex and satisfying. And China Mi&eacute;ville is an author to read both for fun and for quite serious amusement."<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<I>THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER</I></p><p>"Revolutionary in the sheer bravura range of its invention... This is the point in the review where prefabricated accolades like 'this novel heralds a promising new voice on the fantasy horizon' are usually offered up. To hell with that. Mi&eacute;ville isn't on the horizon, he's roared to the center of the map, kicked ass, taken names, and jumped straight to the top of the heap."<br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<I>THE NEW YORK REVIEW OF SCIENCE FICTION</I></p><p>"With his new novel, the gargantuan, intricate, and thoroughly grounded <I>Perdido Street Station</I>, China Mi&eacute;ville moves effortlessly into

Großartige Fantasy-Steampunk Welt und eine mitreißende Horrorgeschichte. Ich fand nur die Vorgeschichte etwas zu weitgreifend.

— Sakuko
Sakuko

So originell kann SciFi-Fantasy-SteamPunk-Nostalgie sein! Skuril-spannend und vor Sprachwitz sprühend! New Crobuzon will erkundet werden!

— Stryke83
Stryke83

Stöbern in Fantasy

Cainsville - Dunkles Omen

Spannende Story mit vielschichtigen Charakteren und einem guten, psychologischen Spannungsaufbau

Nisnis

Schwarzer Horizont

Zwar viele Wendungen und keine uninteressante Welt, aber oberflächliche Charaktere und gewollt vorangetriebene storyline.

kornmuhme

Secrets - Das Geheimnis der Feentochter

Düster, spannend, romantisch, absolut genialllll

clauditweety

Der Große Zoo von China

wahnsinnig fesselnd und obwohl man weiss, das es von Jurassic Park inspiriert wurde richtig gut

MellieJo

Das Vermächtnis der Wölfe Teil 3 - Zwang

Der neue Teil der spanndenden Reise um Zenay und ihre Freunde. Kommt mit auf das Abenteuer ...

Szeraphine

Die Gabe der Könige

Ich hatte sehr viel Freude damit, Hobbs Charaktere durch diese Geschichte zu begleiten und bin froh, dass die Trilogie neu aufgelegt wird.

Flaventus

  • Rezensionen
  • Leserunden
  • Buchverlosungen
  • Themen
  • Großartige Welt mit etwas zu langatmiger Story

    Perdido Street Station
    Sakuko

    Sakuko

    31. December 2016 um 11:29

    Das Buch spielt in dem heruntergekommen, schäbigen, großartigen Stadt-Staat New Crobuzon. Eine Welt in der Magie, Thaumaturgie, Zahnrad-, Dampf-, und andere Techniken sich vermischen und vereinen. Ein Welt in der Menschen, Kaktuswesen, Khepri, froschartigen Vodyanoi, Konstrukte, Elementare mehr oder weniger erfolgreich zusammen leben. Isaac der Grimnebulin ist ein heruntergekommener Wissenschaftler, genial, aber ziellos und zu wirr um sich im Universitätssystem zurechtzufinden. Er bekommt von einem Garuda, eine Rasse menschenähnlicher Jagdvögel, den Auftrag, ihn wieder fliegen zu lassen. Ihm wurden nämlich als Strafe für eine Tat seine Flügel abgeschnitten. Isaac stürzt sich voll Eifer in diesen interessanten Auftrag. Leider lässt er dabei auch völlig unabsichtlich einen sehr gefährliches Wesen auf die Stadt los, das fortan mit seinen Geschwistern die Stadt an den Rand der Auslöschung bringt. Und es scheint das Isaac auch absolut integral ist, diese Gefahr wieder zu beseitigen. Die Welt von New Crobuzon ist einfach großartig. Sehr viele verschiedene Elemente aus Fantasy, Steampunk und Sci-Fi werden hier zu einem neuartigen und frischen Konglomerat vereint. Besonders die Rassen, die die Welt bevölkern, sind alles andere als abgestanden. Sie wirken oft auf den ersten Blick, oder wenn man nur davon erzählt bekommt, albern, surreal, nichts was man ernst nehmen könnte, aber Mieville schafft es diese albern wirkenden Konzepte völlig ernsthaft mit Leben zu füllen und daraus glaubhafte Charaktere zu erschaffen. Die Sprache des Buches ist gehoben, oft tiefsinnig und komplex. Die Welt wird sehr bildhaft dargestellt und gründlich beschrieben. Im Kontrast zu der wunderschönen Sprache ist die Welt aber dunkel, elend und düster, auch die Charaktere reden sehr alltäglich, rau, fluchend. Persönlich finde ich den Kontrast sehr ansprechend, aber ich kenne Leute, die sich davon abgestoßen fühlen. Der Plot des Buches ist in Essenz eigentlich sehr grundlegend, aber die Geschichte beschränkt sich bei weitem nicht auf den Grundplot. Sie fängt ein gutes Stück vorher an, gibt einem Zeit sich mit den Charakteren und der Welt vertraut zu machen. Es braucht dann ein gutes Stück, bis alle Puzzlestücke sich zusammen finden und man eine klare Linie erkennen kann. Ich fand den Einsatz persönlich zu früh. Man hängt zu lange in einer unklaren Geschichte, die sich an verschiedenen Strängen entlang hangelt ohne zu wissen, welche nun relevant sind und die teilweise gegen Ende fast vergessen werden. Letztendlich sind alle Handlungsstränge schon irgendwie relevant, wenn auch nur für das Ende, aber ich hätte es schöner gefunden, wenn da ein paar Sachen gekürzt oder raus gelassen worden wären. Das Buch ist schon lang genug, und ich fände einen etwas gestraffteren Plot besser. Allerdings muss man sagen, dass der elementare Horror der Geschichte wahrscheinlich durch die Vorgeschichte noch besser zu Geltung kommt und dadurch, dass man früh emotional in die Charaktere investiert ist, auch mehr Eindruck hat.

    Mehr