Mary Hooper

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Interview mit Mary Hooper

Interview mit LovelyBooks, Mai 2011.

1) Since when did you write your own stories and how did it come your first book was published?

I started off by writing short stories and wrote lots and lots, then thought I would try and write a book. It was much easier back then (1980s) to get published than it is now!

2) Which author inspires you most of all?

I try not to let anyone inspire me too much.

3) Where do you get the inspiration for your books?

Authors hate being asked this! I am always on the lookout for ideas: problem pages in magazines, features in newspapers, other people's stories, things I come across when researching something else, old letters, etc etc.

4) How do you get in contact with your readers?

They get in contact with me! I have a facebook page with lots of German readers.

5) When and what do you read yourself?

I am always reading something. Usually it is some form of research (at the moment I am reading about the terrible Newgate Prison in London, in the 18th Century). When I am "off duty" I read historical fiction, like Alison Weir or Amanda Foreman.

6) How did it feel do hold your own book in your hands for the first time?

It felt great. I went out and felt that I was famous and that everyone in the world knew me. (Of course they didn't - and still don't!)

7) Do you have any advice for other writers?

Read, read, read...

8) Who is your favorite character in your books so far and why?

My favourite character is usually the last person I have written about, because I feel so close to them. So at the moment it is a girl called Velvet. Which is also the name of my next novel, coming in September in the UK

9) What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

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10) Are you already writing another novel and can you tell us, what it will be about?

I am writing an adult novel set in 1756 about an ordinary woman condemned to death.