Matt Coyle Worry Doll: A Graphic Novel by Matt Coyle (Dover Graphic Novels)

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Inhaltsangabe zu „Worry Doll: A Graphic Novel by Matt Coyle (Dover Graphic Novels)“ von Matt Coyle

". . . Coyle's work is groundbreaking. The imagery in Worry Doll is so far ahead of anything out there in terms of visual sophistication that it suggests a new way forward for the genre—maybe a new genre altogether." — Sebastian Smee, The Daily Telegraph "An amazing piece of work." ― David Lloyd (V for Vendetta) "After seeing Worry Doll my only worry is that I'll never sleep again. Wonderfully creepy stuff." ― Steve Niles (30 Days of Night) A group of dolls find their hosts murdered and flee the crime scene, setting out on a nightmarish road trip. Matt Coyle's inspired gothic noir, disguised as a children's book and filled with hauntingly lifelike pen-and-ink illustrations, offers a dark and disturbing vision that won't soon be forgotten. This edition features a new Foreword by Shaun Tan (The Lost Thing). Suggested for mature readers. "Nothing goes unnoticed in Coyle's meticulous, near-obsessively detailed artwork that marries the finest gothic of best of Bernie Wrightson with the intricate photo-realism of Arthur Ranson, yet with a verisimilitude neither has ever matched." — All Star Comics "I absolutely love it with a passion." — Nerdy Show
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  • Extraordinary art

    Worry Doll: A Graphic Novel by Matt Coyle (Dover Graphic Novels)
    misspider

    misspider

    24. November 2016 um 06:40

    When I started reading Worry Doll, I expected something about one - or more - creepy murderous dolls, maybe along the lines of Chucky but more sophisticated. What I got was different, something about a serial killer psychopath maybe, but a lot of the details are still blurry and left to guesswork I think.While the uniqueness and skill of the illustrations is beyond doubt. The 'zoom-in' pictures showing part of a larger image in close-up detail were ingenious (I immediately thought of other comics which should have used that trick). Keeping the foreword in mind, I also paid special attention to the line drawing, which would have escaped my eye otherwise, and once again: brilliant talent.BUT - there always seems to be a catch, doesn't it? But I must admit: I did not like the pictures. Not because of the subject of the story which makes it impossible to enjoy the abhorrent visions, but simply because I didn't like the style, just like I don't like certain music or paintings while others do - it's just my personal subjective opinion. I thought the main doll itself was very cute, but the 'guy' doll looked totally ugly and disgusting, making me want to look away (but which of course I did not).As with the intermingling text parts, I had a hard time connecting them to the images. At first I thought of the text passages as descriptions of the following or maybe previous pictures, but more often than not I didn't see the connection. After finishing, I scrolled back through the images and found that it was easier to follow the plot with the background story revealed, but a lot of questions remained.The plot is nothing too special, but if you are a fan of unusual graphic novels you may want to give this extraordinary piece of art a try.(Thanks to Netgalley, the author, and the publisher for a copy of the book, all opinions are my own)

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  • Extraordinary art

    Worry Doll: A Graphic Novel by Matt Coyle (Dover Graphic Novels)
    misspider

    misspider

    24. November 2016 um 06:40

    When I started reading Worry Doll, I expected something about one - or more - creepy murderous dolls, maybe along the lines of Chucky but more sophisticated. What I got was different, something about a serial killer psychopath maybe, but a lot of the details are still blurry and left to guesswork I think.While the uniqueness and skill of the illustrations is beyond doubt. The 'zoom-in' pictures showing part of a larger image in close-up detail were ingenious (I immediately thought of other comics which should have used that trick). Keeping the foreword in mind, I also paid special attention to the line drawing, which would have escaped my eye otherwise, and once again: brilliant talent.BUT - there always seems to be a catch, doesn't it? But I must admit: I did not like the pictures. Not because of the subject of the story which makes it impossible to enjoy the abhorrent visions, but simply because I didn't like the style, just like I don't like certain music or paintings while others do - it's just my personal subjective opinion. I thought the main doll itself was very cute, but the 'guy' doll looked totally ugly and disgusting, making me want to look away (but which of course I did not).As with the intermingling text parts, I had a hard time connecting them to the images. At first I thought of the text passages as descriptions of the following or maybe previous pictures, but more often than not I didn't see the connection. After finishing, I scrolled back through the images and found that it was easier to follow the plot with the background story revealed, but a lot of questions remained.The plot is nothing too special, but if you are a fan of unusual graphic novels you may want to give this extraordinary piece of art a try.(Thanks to Netgalley, the author, and the publisher for a copy of the book, all opinions are my own)

    Mehr